a murder in virginia southern justice on trial

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A Murder In Virginia

Author : Suzanne Lebsock
ISBN : 0393326063
Genre : History
File Size : 86. 35 MB
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Recounts the events surrounding the dramatic post-Civil War trial of a young African American sawmill hand who was accused of ax murdering a white woman on her Virginia farm and who implicated three other women in the crime. Reprint.

A Murder In Virginia

Author : Suzanne Lebsock
ISBN : 0393042014
Genre : History
File Size : 52. 67 MB
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Recounts the events surrounding the dramatic post-Civil War trial of a young African American sawmill hand who was accused of ax murdering a white woman on her Virginia farmyard and who implicated three other women in the crime. 15,000 first printing.

The Free Women Of Petersburg

Author : Suzanne Lebsock
ISBN : 0393952649
Genre : History
File Size : 83. 35 MB
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In a new book that has important implications for our vision of the female past, Suzanne Lebsock examines the question, Did the position of women in America deteriorate or improve in the first half of the nineteenth century? Winner of the Bancroft Prize for 1985.

The Historic Murder Trial Of George Crawford

Author : David Bradley
ISBN : 9780786494682
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 50. 99 MB
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The Depression-era murder trial of George Crawford in Northern Virginia helped end the exclusion of African Americans from juries. Nearly forgotten today, the murders, ensuing manhunt, extradition battle and sensational trial enthralled the nation. Before it was over, the U.S. House of Representatives threatened to impeach a federal judge, the age-old states rights debate was renewed, and a rift nearly split the fledgling NAACP. In the end, the story's hero--Howard University Law School dean Charles Hamilton Houston--was the subject of public ridicule from critics who had little understanding of the inner workings of the case. This book puts the Crawford murder trial in its fullest context, side by side with relevant events of the time.

Cradle Of America

Author : Peter Wallenstein
ISBN : UVA:X030109897
Genre : History
File Size : 58. 43 MB
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In this first single-authored history of Virginia since the 1970s, Peter Wallenstein traces major themes across four centuries in a brisk narrative that recalls the people and events that have shaped the Old Dominion.

Crucible Of The Civil War

Author : Edward L. Ayers
ISBN : 9780813930497
Genre : History
File Size : 66. 22 MB
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Crucible of the Civil War offers an illuminating portrait of the state’s wartime economic, political, and social institutions. Weighing in on contentious issues within established scholarship while also breaking ground in areas long neglected by scholars, the contributors examine such concerns as the war’s effect on slavery in the state, the wartime intersection of race and religion, and the development of Confederate social networks. They also shed light on topics long disputed by historians, such as Virginia’s decision to secede from the Union, the development of Confederate nationalism, and how Virginians chose to remember the war after its close.

Virginia Women

Author : Cynthia A. Kierner
ISBN : 9780820347417
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 75. 73 MB
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Virginia Women is the first of two volumes exploring the history of Virginia women through the lives of exemplary and remarkable individuals. This collection of seventeen essays, written by established and emerging scholars, recovers the stories and voices of a diverse group of women, from the seventeenth century through the Civil War era. Placing their subjects in their larger historical contexts, the authors show how the experiences of Virginia women varied by race, class, age, and marital status, and also across both space and time. Some essays examine the lives of wellknown women--such as First Lady Dolley Madison--from a new perspective. Others introduce readers to relatively obscure historical figures: the convicted witch Grace Sherwood; the colonial printer Clementina Rind; Harriet Hemings, the enslaved daughter of Thomas Jefferson. Essays on the frontier heroine Mary Draper Ingles and the Civil War spy Elizabeth Van Lew examine the real women behind the legends. Altogether, the essays in this collection offer readers an engaging and personal window onto the experiences of women in the Old Dominion. Contributors: Catherine Allgor on Dolley Madison; E. Susan Barber on Sally Louisa Tompkins; Mary C. Ferrari on Mary Draper Ingles; Lisa A. Francavilla on Ellen Wayles Randolph Coolidge; Catherine Kerrison on Harriet Hemings; Cynthia A. Kierner on Grace Sherwood; Martha J. King on Clementina Rind; Michelle A. Krowl on Antonia Ford Willard; Jon Kukla on Elizabeth Henry Campbell Russell; Deborah A. Lee on Ann R. Page and Mary L. Custis; Sarah Hand Meacham on Elizabeth Jacquelin Ambler Brent Carrington; Helen C. Rountree on Edy Turner; Kristalyn M. Shefveland on Cockacoeske and Sarah Harris Stegge Grendon; Terri L. Snyder on Jane Webb and Her Family; Linda L. Sturtz on Sarah Jerdone; Gail S. Terry on Anne Henry Christian; Elizabeth R. Varon on Elizabeth Van Lew.

Pocahontas Powhatan Opechancanough

Author : Helen C. Rountree
ISBN : 9780813933405
Genre : History
File Size : 28. 8 MB
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Pocahontas may be the most famous Native American who ever lived, but during the settlement of Jamestown, and for two centuries afterward, the great chiefs Powhatan and Opechancanough were the subjects of considerably more interest and historical documentation than the young woman. It was Opechancanough who captured the foreign captain "Chawnzmit"—John Smith. Smith gave Opechancanough a compass, described to him a spherical earth that revolved around the sun, and wondered if his captor was a cannibal. Opechancanough, who was no cannibal and knew the world was flat, presented Smith to his elder brother, the paramount chief Powhatan. The chief, who took the name of his tribe as his throne name (his personal name was Wahunsenacawh), negotiated with Smith over a lavish feast and opened the town to him, leading Smith to meet, among others, Powhatan’s daughter Pocahontas. Thinking he had made an ally, the chief finally released Smith. Within a few decades, and against their will, his people would be subjects of the British Crown. Despite their roles as senior politicians in these watershed events, no biography of either Powhatan or Opechancanough exists. And while there are other "biographies" of Pocahontas, they have for the most part elaborated on her legend more than they have addressed the known facts of her remarkable life. As the 400th anniversary of Jamestown’s founding approaches, nationally renowned scholar of Native Americans, Helen Rountree, provides in a single book the definitive biographies of these three important figures. In their lives we see the whole arc of Indian experience with the English settlers – from the wary initial encounters presided over by Powhatan, to the uneasy diplomacy characterized by the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, to the warfare and eventual loss of native sovereignty that came during Opechancanough’s reign. Writing from an ethnohistorical perspective that looks as much to anthropology as the written records, Rountree draws a rich portrait of Powhatan life in which the land and the seasons governed life and the English were seen not as heroes but as Tassantassas (strangers), as invaders, even as squatters. The Powhatans were a nonliterate people, so we have had to rely until now on the white settlers for our conceptions of the Jamestown experiment. This important book at last reconstructs the other side of the story.

Southern Horrors

Author : Crystal Nicole Feimster
ISBN : 0674035623
Genre : History
File Size : 42. 53 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence. Pairing the lives of two Southern womenâe"Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white womenâe"Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women. Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.

John Brown S Trial

Author : Brian McGinty
ISBN : 9780674035171
Genre : Biography & Autobiography
File Size : 89. 34 MB
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Mixing idealism with violence, abolitionist John Brown cut a wide swath across the United States before winding up in Virginia, where he led an attack on the U.S. armory and arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Supported by a "provisional army" of 21 men, Brown hoped to rouse the slaves in Virginia to rebellion. But he was quickly captured and, after a short but stormy trial, hanged on December 2, 1859. Brian McGinty provides the first comprehensive account of the trial, which raised important questions about jurisdiction, judicial fairness, and the nature of treason under the American constitutional system.

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